Tsumura [13] classified the different location of obstructive ban

Tsumura [13] classified the different location of obstructive band adhesions and estimated their frequency: anterior visceroparietal adhesions (between anterior abdominal wall and small bowel) (40%), anterior visceroparietal adhesions associated to viscerovisceral adhesions (small bowel) (32%), viscerovisceral adhesions (small bowel) (16%), posterior visceroparietal adhesions (between posterior peritoneum and small bowel) (8%), anterior and posterior visceroparietal adhesions associated AZD5153 concentration to viscerovisceral adhesions (4%). The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions (anterior visceroparietal adhesions, anterior visceroparietal

adhesions associated to viscerovisceral adhesions and viscerovisceral adhesions) compared to patients with posterior band adhesions (posterior visceroparietal adhesions, anterior and posterior visceroparietal adhesions associated to viscerovisceral adhesions) (50% vs 22.7%). Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis, which always needs a resection imperatively performed laparotomically [46, 53], and accidental

enterotomies. The frequency of accidental enterotomies is variable (Table 2) [15, 16, 18–22, 24–27, 29, 38, 39, 41, 42], being more frequent in patients who have a history of previous multiple laparotomies selleckchem [3, 19]. Most of the accidental enterotomies occur while performing adhesiolysis. The other less common mechanism of injury is the Verres needle insertion, reported in the Levard’s [25], Parent’s [26] and Chèvre’s [27] series. It is often necessary to perform a laparotomic conversion in order to suture or to perform a resection and anastomosis of the perforated bowel. The suture performed through open access gives more chances of endurance and safety, especially when done on a dilated and fragile obstructed bowel [54]. When the accidental enterotomy is not pointed out at operating time, it can show

up in postoperative course as a peritonitis that increases morbidity and mortality. Unrecognized accidental enterotomies, discovered by the onset of postoperative peritonitis, are an increasingly frequent cause of malpractice claims [55]. Defensive medicine has Bucladesine mouse delineated many practical strategies in order to avoid accidental enterotomies during laparoscopic adhesiolysis: PtdIns(3,4)P2 accurate patient selection excluding patients with history of multiple abdominal surgical procedures and taking early indication for surgical treatment, and particular attention to surgical techniques [56] always staying close to parietal peritoneum during dissection, not sectioning tenacious band adhesions and always controlling the direction of the instruments. Borzellino routinely performs a preoperatory ultrasonographic mapping of visceroparietal adhesions, in order to avoid lesions resulting from Veress’ needle insertion [24].

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